Author: jamesonz

Surging Seas 10 feet

3 Mapping Technologies That Will Change How You See NYC

New York City has always been a city in flux, with compelling local histories buried as quickly as new histories are born. These three innovative mapping technologies from artists and developers worldwide allow users to explore the city in entirely new ways — all from the convenience of a smartphone or laptop. Don’t take NYC at face value; use these three tools to uncover the past, future, and hidden present of your city. 1. Surging Seas Surging Seas is an interactive map with a unique premise: displaying the coastline changes that would occur at various forecasted sea-level rises over the next century. The map was created by the ever-creative team at Stamen, a digital agency based in San Francisco with a special focus in mapping and research technologies. For Surging Seas, the developers aimed to differentiate themselves from existing forecast tools by creating a map that highlighted the “land that’s lost,” showing how even “minor” changes like the 13 feet rise caused by Hurricane Sandy can radically alter the shape of the city. 2. Spyglass …

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6 Genre-Bending Artists You Should Follow on Instagram

Instagram can be a gold mine for creative inspiration, but it sometimes feels like artist accounts on the ubiquitous social media platform are more self-promotional than authentically engaging. With 400 million active users, it can be hard to find quality content outside the tropes and cliches. Here’s a roundup of some of our favorite artists using Instagram in unique ways — from digital installations to math-infused origami masterpieces. @prismspecs New media artist and programmer Grayson Earle is constantly breaking down boundaries between tech and art with interactive exhibitions and hand-crafted digital games. The process, from conceptual sketches to halfway-completed hardware, is documented on his Instagram account alongside a heavy helping of glitch art and tongue-in-cheek tech humor. People Pattern #loop #glitchart #generativeart #netflix #videoart @illuminator99 @saddestlunch A video posted by Grayson (@prismspecs) on Jan 28, 2016 at 8:32pm PST Earle is based in Brooklyn, where his work was most recently shown in the AgitProp! exhibit at the Brooklyn Museum.   @sopopomo Manila-born, Texas based artist Dan Lam and her friendly [and touchable] neon-hued sculptures.  A …

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Mirror for the Middle Class: Duane Hanson in Retrospect

Winning over the general public isn’t always a good thing in the art market, where popularity with the middle class frequently translates to poor sales among wealthy patrons and art collectors. So it’s fitting that the late sculptor Duane Hanson’s body of work is seeing a resurgence of interest just as the middle class — the subject of his life’s work — slowly erodes in the face of technological innovation and industrial automation. Brushed aside by the tastemakers of the seventies, Hanson’s startlingly life-like portrayals of average Americans have been called “achingly beautiful” by The Guardian, drawing comparisons to Edward Hopper and other classic realists. Editorial attention tends to play up the time-traveling effect the works have on the viewer. The appeal is part fashion tourism, part self-recognition. While the clothing choices are garish and the moments captured depressingly banal, the imortalization of seemingly meaningless moments is bound to resonate with the selfie generation (or the older generations trapped in it with us). Pieces like “Young Shopper” and “Tourists II” have a certain voyeuristic appeal, …

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Sculptor Ben Young Illuminates the Underpinnings of Islands

“I spy something blue.” So reads the punchline to one of those lonely island gag cartoons in The New Yorker, where two castaways sit back to back on an island barely big enough for themselves and a lone palm. On first glance, the austere combinations of concrete and plate glass on display at Kirra Galleries might remind us of these sorts of lonely island cliches. The difference is in the depths — isolated rock faces and quasi-volcanic outcrops push up from opaque cubes, which seem to simultaneously imprison and define the land masses within. Whatever associations poured concrete might hold with brutalism melt away under the soft embrace of cut glass. Originally a New Zealander with a background in boatbuilding, artist Ben Young began glass cutting as a hobby inspired by his father’s humble garage-shop art projects. Combined with a boatmaker’s propensity for 3D modeling and meticulous handcrafting, Young began developing sculptures inspired by his experiences with the sea through boating and surfing at a young age. It’s only recently, however, that his work has …

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Pixel Pushers: New York’s School for Poetic Computation is Art’s Answer to Coding Boot camps

Artists make no money but get to make beautiful things. Computer programmers make money — but have to do boring work. …At least, that’s what most of us who have been shuffled through the American education system are led to believe. New York’s School for Poetic Computation (SFPC) stands in stark contrast to the separation of computer science and the fine arts. Similar to “coding boot camps” like Hack Reactor and General Assembly that have sprung up to provide the practical web development education unavailable in most colleges, the SFPC is small, nimble, and results-oriented. The difference is, while coding boot camps strive to pump out node.js aficionados, SFPC is creating a different breed of computer programmer: the artist as technologist. School For Poetic Computation is equal parts The Factory, childhood blanket fort, and mad scientist’s lab. —Lee Tusman, SFPC student Founded by an interdisciplinary group of creatives and scientists in 2013, the SFPC program centers around a loosely-structured 10-week program that brings together students from a variety of computer science backgrounds to create aesthetic-oriented …

Digitized Fabrics Could Turn Your Wardrobe Into Wearable Touchscreens

While smartphones that bend and flex under pressure are just now coming onto the market, Google and a handful of scrappy startups are imagining a future where sensitive, connected surfaces will make the jump from the phones in our pockets to the shirts on our backs. Literally. Tech Startups like Athos have been working towards this goal for years, creating Bluetooth-enabled fabrics that operate through a series of integrated Bluetooth sensors. But Project Jacquard, a new initiative from Google, is taking the technology to the next level with an experimental conductive fabric that has “technology woven in.” Jacquard allows potential smart clothing startups to weave conductive yarns made from metallic alloys blended with traditional mediums like polyester and silk into regular fabrics, essentially turning the finished yards of fabric into giant woven touchscreens. Motion capture and touch sensitivity paired with an arsenal of integrated electronics allow app developers to “hack” the resulting garments on an intimate level. While current consumer tech “wearables” like the Microsoft Band enable users to track their physical stats through their …

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Painting for Paris: Art World Response to the Paris Attacks

    The aftermath of the November terrorist attacks against the French people saw the world light up with support and solidarity. #prayforparis sentiment still runs strong weeks later, as citizens of the world react against the senseless violence on exhibition across Europe, America, and the Middle East. While no amount of hope can bring back the 100s lost at the Bataclan concert hall, artists across the world have struck back through their work and brought the world together around symbols of peace and togetherness; most notably the Eiffel Tower peace symbol, now as common a sight on canvas as spray-painted in the streets. We’ve gathered some of the most inspiring drawings, paintings, and Internet artwork created in response to the Paris attacks. In a particularly intriguing comic response, cartoonist Joann Sfar broke the fourth wall of his regular slice-of-life comic Instagram to share his vision of France with his national audience. “I am so sad many English speaking friends did not understand my cartoon. I did not write against your beliefs or against spirituality.” — …

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Eyewriter Brings Grassroots Tech to Urban Streets

What happens when an artist looses their hands? A new tool from a unique creative team at Eyewriter.org allows disabled artists to literally express their eye for design. When LA graffiti artist Tempt One was diagnosed with the degenerative disease ALS, it seemed that hope was lost. The once-prolific artist became completely paralyzed, with his only connection to the outside world the eye-tracking computer systems available to the profoundly paralyzed. But the story doesn’t end there. By partnering with a collection of arts and technology organizations including OpenFrameworks, FAT Lab, and the Graffiti Research Lab, Tempt One has grasped onto eye-tracking technology as a life raft and begun the development of a new medium: an open source, widely available eye-tracking system to allow paralyzed artists to share their visions with the world. “Art is a tool of empowerment and social change, and I consider myself blessed to be able to create and use my work to promote health reform, bring awareness about ALS and help others.” —Tempt One For a pop culture whose only exposure …

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Strelka Press: Architecture, Design, and a New Kind of Book

Strelka Institute has its headquarters on an island in the Moscow river — but for all that their programs resemble the troubled city surrounding them, they may as well be on an island in the middle of the ocean. Design is business; Strelka operates as a nonprofit. Academia is fractured into specialized niches; Strelka students reject discipline, sharing a single course of study with roots in architecture and art, but calling itself by neither title. And most importantly, while Publishing is dying, Strelka Press is thriving. Since launching an initial series of print and ebooks in 2012 from a curated group of writers with urbanism backgrounds, the press has continued to produce a steady stream of beautifully designed books — touching on subjects as diverse as the Internet of Things and the linked histories of Soviet architecture in Russia and China. I’ve never thought that I need to study only to get a profession. —Natasha Kupriyanova, Strelka student While the books themselves are engaging on their own merits (and bound by a minimal 2.0 graphic …

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Art Basel Miami Beach: Leading Galleries, Big Parties

Art Basel Miami Beach (ABMB) is back and bigger than ever this year. 267 galleries are scheduled to exhibit, alongside countless more screenings, parties, and unofficial events. Gallery-hoppers will find an unforgettable mix of high art, cultural experiences, and no-holds-barred Miami-style partying. (And of course, champagne on the sand.) The ABMB’s crown jewel this year will be a $10 million Willem de Kooning, Untitled IV. The gallery holds an impressive collection of de Kooning’s drawings and paintings, all well worth the price of admission on their own account. Miami is widely regarded as the center for Latin American art in the US, so it’s no surprise that a strong contingent of galleries will be making the journey north from South America. Galería Elba Benítez and Galeria Nara Roesler, among others, will be bringing hundreds of Latin American artists between them, including some compelling installation work. Keep an eye out for the politically-infused sculptures of Antonio Dias, whose sculpture series based on ballot boxes should be particularly resonant in this tumultuous election season. On the other side …