All posts filed under: Photographers

french photographer Léa Bartet-Friburg

Grannie by Léa Bartet-Friburg

This is a story about my grandmother’s perception, the objects that surrounded her with which I grew up, her garden, her house in Normandy, her taste for fashion, and beautiful things that she passed on to me, and Africa… always Africa. My grandfather was from Togo but he died very young, yet she kept very close contacts with this African family year after year, she’s our only link with this black side that we can see on our skin and which seems so far from our native Normandy, France. All the styling are items found in her closet, the fabrics used for the images have been brought back by her from Ghana and Togo (Wax et Keta). Her expressions are distinguished, proud, and independent. —by photographer Léa Bartet-Friburg

Thủ Thiêm, the new and the old, a photo documentary by Adriana Roos

This is a story of loss and change, of family, land and redevelopment. Thủ Thiêm is an urban development project on District 2, Ho Chi Minh City. As in almost all stories of redevelopment, there’s a back-story. Before its clearance, Thủ Thiêm was one of the most densely settled areas in the city and included a central market established in 1751. As of today, site clearance of the area is almost completed, between 14-15,000 households have been removed from the development site and resettled after more of a decade clearing 720 hectares of land. The following images aim to tell the back-story, looking at a family who’s lived there, in the same house, for more than a 100 years. They have almost no neighbours left, just rubble and empty spaces around them. This is their story: All images courtesy of photographer Adriana Roos More information and data about Thủ Thiêm New Urban Area  

Frozen In Time, Discovering XVIII Century Palace Sanssouci by Anton Shebetko

Sanssouci is a palace in Potsdam, near Berlin. Its French name translates as “without concerns”, meaning “without worries” or “carefree.” It was intended to be the summer palace for Frederick the Great, King of Prussia, as a place for relaxation vs.  a seat of power. “The location and layout of Sanssouci above a vineyard reflected the pre-Romantic ideal of harmony between man and nature, in a landscape ordered by human touch.” — More about Sanssouci In this photo editorial, Ukranian artist Anton Shebetko studies the relationship between ourselves and this timeless space. Exploring our perception of the [Rococo-style] sculptures, the way we interact with this frozen-in-time-place that was conceived for the joy of the senses.