Month: October 2015

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Veronika Vilim by Julien Bernard

“For me, there is very little difference between magic and art. To me, the ultimate act of magic is to create something from nothing: It’s like when the stage magician pulls the rabbit from the hat.” — Alan Moore —  An editorial by Paris-based photographer Julien Bernard, stylist Eve Sebagh, Makeup Ismael Blanco @ Agence Aurelien, Hair Anais Lucas for Leonor Greyl, Model Veronika Vilim @ Supreme pants Faith Connexion, tee-shirt SAINT LAURENT, waistcoat HARLEY DAVIDSON vest CLASH LE PERFECTO, dress ETAM dress FAITH CONNEXION, boots SAINT LAURENT kimono TOPSHOP, crop top AMERICAN APPAREL dress SAINT LAURENT, shoes VINTAGE dress DIOR VINTAGE dress DOLCE & GABANNA shirt & underwear FAITH CONNEXION

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Nicole Dollanganger – Natural Born Losers review

Stoufville, Ontario’s Nicole Dollanganger delivers a dark, sweet mumblecore folk record for Grimes’ new imprint, Eerie Organization. It’s hard not to draw comparisons between Nicole Dollanganger’s atmospheric folk-tinted bedroom rock and Harmony Korine’s filmography. On Natural Born Losers, there’s “A Marvelous Persona”, a nod to Gummo’s larger-than-life bad boy Tummler, he of the marvelous persona. Dollanganger has previously referenced Korine’s directorial debut, following “Bunny Boy” from 2014’s BabyLand, along with a haunting homage to Beverly Marsh from Stephen King’s “It”. Bunny boys, cool losers, battered heroines haunted by abusive fathers and homicidal shape-shifting clowns, all of these images would be at home in a Nicole Dollanganger record. Like Korine’s work, there is nothing all that ominous and unsettling on the surface of Dollanganger’s ghostly folk music. Korine’s movies focus on the lives of the fringe dwellers – trailer park denizens and celebrity impostors. Korine shows the darkness and desperation of “normal people” eking out an existence, but not as some morality tale. The darkness is just a shade and texture, like a cloud passing across …

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Why Are You Looking at Me: Lucky Blue Smith in the Age of Instagram Celebrity

Three blond sisters. All homeschooled, all Morman, and all playing washed out surf rock together in the same band, The Atomics. Yet it’s the drummer, their brother Lucky, who has drawn the legions of fans; and although the band’s music has a snare-driven hypnotic quality meriting attention in its own right, it is Lucky’s celebrity as a model that has propelled the group into the public eye. At only sixteen, Lucky Blue Smith has walked for brands like Levi’s, Versace and Tom Ford and has his sights set on that elusive model/actor/musician combination best exemplified by the likes of Justin Bieber. Similar to Bieber, Lucky’s rise to fame has been with the help of legions of teenage girls, through the channels that celebrity 2.0 knows best; Instagram (1.4 million followers) and the flash-mob meet-and-greets that allow the young fans of young social media heartthrobs to meet their idols face-to-face. Unlike Bieber, the Smith family’s unusual background and modest lifestyle maintains an indie credibility that makes Lucky a rare specimen in the often homogeneous flow of internet celebrity: a weirdo …

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Poetic Computation: The Handmade Computers of Taeyoon Choi

Designers praise Apple for covering their circuit boards in clean, curved skins. Consumers demand software that is unobtrusive and hardware that is small and tucked away. The rising Internet of Things fills the human habitat with computers that are only distinguishable from analog objects by the intelligent behaviors they exhibit when no one is watching. In a market driven by invisibility and utility, the handmade computer installations of New York and Seoul-based artist Taeyoon Choi are more likely to remind the casual observer of “toys” than “machines.” Toys and art have a core value in common, so far as the general public is concerned; no one expects them to “do” anything. Well, nothing productive anyway. While the tasks that occupy Choi’s computers are often inscrutable (animating cutlery at Ikea, conducting measurements of personalised time), it is not their whimsical programming but rather the bright colors and blinking circuit boards that make it challenging to categorize the objects as computers. Apps and user interfaces that feel alive and welcoming are normal in day-to-day life — even expected. However, the general …